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Daily Digest 6/5 - Collapse Has Arrived, U.S. Jobs Market Much Worse Than Data Suggests

Chris Martenson - June 5, 2017 - 05:24
  • As Russia probe grinds on, Trump struggles to gain traction on agenda
  • The Numbers Are In: A Single-Payer Health System in California Would Cover Everyone and Save Tens of Billions a Year
  • Why Aren’t American Teenagers Working Anymore?
  • The U.S. Jobs Market: Much Worse Than The Official Data Suggest
  • Retirees flock to Latin America to live an upper-class lifestyle on $1,500 a month
  • Dimming Bulb 3: Collapse has Arrived
  • What Exiting The Paris Agreement Means For U.S. Utilities
  • Grand Canyon at risk as Arizona officials ask Trump to end uranium mining ban

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Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 6/3 - The Addicts Next Door, Could California Be The Next Puerto Rico?

Chris Martenson - June 3, 2017 - 07:57
  • The Addicts Next Door
  • Borrowing to fund pensions could make California the next Puerto Rico
  • Gold, Silver Or Bitcoin-Crypto Currencies: Where Will The Big Money Be Made?
  • Hidden Away for 28 Years, Tiananmen Protest Pictures See Light of Day
  • Silver and NASDAQ Strength Will Reverse
  • The Watson Files
  • Canada Pushes For Zero Emission Vehicle Strategy
  • Food poisoning warning: Hepatitis E found in European pig products

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Categories: Economics

Less Than Zero: How The Fed Killed Saving

Chris Martenson - June 2, 2017 - 15:27

Savings accounts were created to provide an incentive for people to plan for the future. Put money away today, let it grow through the miracle of compounding interest, and have more tomorrow.

Prudent savings is essential to a healthy economy. It offers resilience during downturns, and provides seed capital for productive enterprise.

But we are no longer a nation of savers. The Federal Reserve has killed the incentive to be one.

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Categories: Economics

Off The Cuff: The Demise Of The Current World Order

Chris Martenson - June 2, 2017 - 13:00

In this week's Off The Cuff podcast, Chris and Charles Hugh Smith discuss:

  • History Is Full Of Cycles
    • 80-year & 240-year being the most dominant for empires
  • At The Cycles End
    • The US is at the end of both a 240-yr AND 80-yr cycle
  • A Global Reset
    • Given the huge distortions, a worldwide reckoning is overdue
  • What Will Emerge From The Ashes?
    • Will the new order make better decisions?

This week, Chris and Charles look across the expanse of history, at past empires and the paths they followed as they collapsed. They see many signs that the current world order is reaching its last moments before something new emerges -- likely out of the chaos of a systemic reset.

Before that happens though, the current system needs to topple under the weight of its shortcomings, one of which is the concentration of wealth and power into fewer and fewer hands. Charles explains where to keep our focus:

90% of our entire income, national income, and interactions are with a handful of cartels. Which we now have new ones. We've got Google, which is essentially a monopoly. We have Facebook, which is a monopoly. The dominant players are Apple, Netflix. The usual crowd. Amazon. They are so large, so wealthy that they're basically so far beyond competition that they're a monopoly. Once they start lobbying the pay for play democracy we have, then they're really going to be unassailable. Once they learn the tricks of the insurance companies and the military industrial complex and higher education, then they're going to build a regulatory moat that no one can get around, on top of their other advantages.

We've got for profit cartels and then we have the central state. Which is married to the cartels -- because they both need each other, they feed off each other. Those are failed models. Those platforms are going to unravel

Click to listen to a sample of this Off the Cuff Podcast or Enroll today to access the full audio and other premium content today.

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Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 6/2 - Good News Friday: The World's Largest Floating Solar Plant, India To Go All Electric By 2030

Chris Martenson - June 2, 2017 - 09:24
  • Automatic Voter Registration OK'd by Illinois Lawmakers 
  • India aiming for all-electric car fleet by 2030, petrol and diesel to be tanked
  • Bucking Trump, These Cities, States and Companies Commit to Paris Accord
  • As U.S. retreats, EU and China seek climate leadership at summit
  • The world’s largest floating solar power plant just went online in China
  • Exxon investors clash with executives, vote in favor of annual climate report
  • Kentucky Is Making It Easier for Organizations to Donate Extra Food
  • An inside view of Hong-Kong’s hidden rooftop farms

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Categories: Economics

An Informal Settlement in Puerto Rico Has Become the World's First Favela Community Land Trust

Shareable Magazine - June 1, 2017 - 11:54

In San Juan, Puerto Rico, government, residents, and technical professionals created a Community Land Trust (CLT), known locally as Fideicomiso de la Tierra, to preserve and develop informal communities along the Martín Peña Canal.

Categories: Economics

REMINDER: The End Of Money Webinar

Chris Martenson - June 1, 2017 - 10:02

A reminder that our upcoming webinar, The End Of Money, happens in less than a week -- on Wednesday, June 7th.

If you haven't already, register for it now

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Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 6/1 - The Greatest Financial Bubble in History, China Vows To Stand By Paris Agreement

Chris Martenson - June 1, 2017 - 06:07
  • The Greatest Financial Bubble in History
  • Mylan shareholders revolt, say directors’ greed has gone too far
  • Invest In Yourself
  • Kafka In Vegas
  • Saudi Prince Mohammed Meets With Putin To Discuss Oil, Syria
  • How Rising Seas Drowned the Flood Insurance Program
  • You're Not Imagining It: Your Allergies Really Are Worse This Year
  • As Trump Wavers on Climate Pact, China Vows to Stand by It

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Categories: Economics

Couple Builds Community Cupboard in One of Winnipeg's Poorest Neighborhoods

Shareable Magazine - May 31, 2017 - 10:16

The idea behind the community cupboard is straightforward: If you have food or other items you want to share, put it in the cupboard, and if you need anything, just take it. Kelly Hughes and Andrea Vaile opened an outdoor cupboard in front of their house in Winnipeg's Centennial neighborhood at the beginning of June. "It seemed like something that had to be done, and we were here, so why not do it?" says Hughes, the project's cofounder.

Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 5/31 - Saudi Reserves Dip Below $500B, Brood Awakening

Chris Martenson - May 31, 2017 - 07:51
  • State lawmakers consider Brown’s gamble on pension money
  • Hartford looking to state to help prevent bankruptcy
  • Illinois House full of action but no budget choice debate
  • Saudi reserves dip below $500 billion
  • Why India's Zombie Debt Imperils Modi's Plans: QuickTake Q&A
  • German Inflation Slows More Than Forecast as ECB Meeting Nears
  • The challenges in setting up a California single-payer system are daunting — but not insurmountable
  • Brood Awakening: 17-Year Cicadas Emerge 4 Years Early

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Categories: Economics

Podcast: How Employee Ownership Can be Advantageous for Your Business

Shareable Magazine - May 31, 2017 - 00:09

In this episode of Next Economy Now, Shawn Berry, partner and worker-owner at LIFT Economy, interviews Blake Jones, co-founder and president of Namaste Solar, a 100 percent employee-owned solar electric company based in Colorado. He began his career working as a civil engineer in the oil and gas industry. He then spent time in Nepal implementing solar, wind, hydro, and electric vehicle technologies.

Categories: Economics

Why Ride-Hailing App Juno's Acquisition Points to a Need for Platform Co-ops

Shareable Magazine - May 30, 2017 - 16:17

The New York City based ride-hailing app Juno was widely marketed as a different type of platform — one that values its drivers. The company went as far as to say that it would give equity to its drivers. However, in an unexpected turn of events, Juno announced in April that it was being acquired by ride-hailing platform Gett for $200 million.

Categories: Economics

Renowned Urban Planning Professor Julian Agyeman Joins Shareable's Advisory Board

Shareable Magazine - May 30, 2017 - 08:42

We're thrilled to welcome Julian Agyeman, professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, to Shareable’s advisory board. Please read more about Agyeman's prolific and impactful work in sustainability and environmental justice below.

Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 5/30 - The Truth About Glass-Steagall, The Dangers Of Living Without Purpose

Chris Martenson - May 30, 2017 - 08:07
  • MARK YUSKO: 'The U.S. is going to have a crash and it will be massive'
  • The Dangerous Approach of Living Without Purpose
  • State Dept. lifts limit on refugee admissions
  • What Congress can learn from Kansas’s failed tax experiment
  • The Truth About Glass-Steagall
  • State appeals court rules Exxon must give records to NY prosecutor
  • Is This Saudi Arabia’s Newest Strategy To Boost Oil Prices?
  • Great Barrier Reef can no longer be saved, Australian experts concede

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Categories: Economics

Lance Roberts: This Market Is Like A Tanker Of Gasoline

Chris Martenson - May 30, 2017 - 00:09

Lance Roberts, chief investment strategist of Clarity Financial and chief editor of Real Investment Advice has authored a number of impressive recent reports identifying potential failure points in today's financial markets. 

In this week's podcast, Lance explains how the massive flood of investment capital into passively-managed ETFs, along with record amounts of margin debt, have the potential to set the markets afire.

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Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 5/29 - The Great War For Eurasia, Why Are Women Dropping Out Of The Workforce?

Chris Martenson - May 29, 2017 - 09:16
  • Keep Calm And Carry On
  • Why are so many women dropping out of the workforce?
  • The 3rd wave of WIKI-the half empty cup
  • The Great U.S. Energy Debt Wall: It’s Going To Get Very Ugly
  • The Great War For Eurasia
  • Donald Trump’s Base Is Shrinking
  • Russian Energy Minister: Deeper Cuts Still On The Table
  • A flight over Hong Kong's secret farms

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Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 5/27 - Mile Markers on the Road to Ruin, Food Stamps And Health

Chris Martenson - May 27, 2017 - 07:27
  • Deaths from Alzheimer’s disease in the US have risen by 55%, says CDC
  • The Beleaguered Tenants of ‘Kushnerville’
  • Selected Articles: A Corrupted View of Reality in the Western Media 
  • How a remote California tribe set out to save its river and stop a suicide epidemic
  • The Messy Relationship Between Food Stamps and Health
  • Mile Markers on the Road to Ruin
  • Farming the World: China’s Epic Race to Avoid a Food Crisis
  • Trump Delays Decision on Paris Climate Accords

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Categories: Economics

Understanding The Fed's Endgame Is Key To Protecting Your Wealth

Chris Martenson - May 26, 2017 - 20:52
Executive Summary
  • Why the Fed's rate hikes are not actual "hikes"
  • The new debt issuance directly or indirectly enabled by the Fed is staggeringly large
  • Why the Fed's intervention in the financial markets is creating worrisome instability
  • As the risks mount, what should the concerned investor do?

If you have not yet read Part 1: The Federal Reserve Is Destroying America available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

When Is A Rate Hike Not A Rate Hike?

The Fed keeps talking about raising interest rates, but they really aren’t doing any such thing.  In fact they are doing the opposite.

I know that’s a controversial statement, so let me explain.  The point of a ‘rate hike’ is not to make the cost of money (interest rates) go up, but to drain excess money from the system.  That’s why a rate hike cycle is called a ‘tightening’ cycle; because it is making the amount of money available for lending to shrink, or for conditions to become tighter.  The same as if you don’t have quite enough money at the end of the month, things are tight. 

This means that the interest rate is the derivative, and the amount of money is the main driver.  You don’t set interest rates, you control the amount of money in the system, and the interest rates follow along.  They are the result, not the cause.

Or at least that’s how it used to be.  But not any longer.

In the past, when the Fed ‘hiked rates’ what it actually did was drain money from the system.   Money out = interest rates up.

Now when the Fed hikes rates it removes zero money in the system, and this is why a rate hike is not actually a rate hike at all, but the opposite because it leaves 100% of the money in the system but raises the amount that banks and other financial institutions can charge you for new loans and outstanding credit.

How did we get to this ‘upside down world’ where a rate hike increases money? 

To understand let’s be sure we are clear on...

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Categories: Economics

The Federal Reserve Is Destroying America

Chris Martenson - May 26, 2017 - 20:50

The Federal Reserve is destroying America. 

It might have good intentions, but it's working with bad models. Ones that lead to truly horrible outcomes.

One of the chief failings of central banks is that they are slaves to an impossible idea; the notion that humans are free to pursue perpetual exponential economic growth on a finite planet. 

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Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 5/26 - Good News Friday: Manchester Rallies With Kindness, The Future Of Fish

Chris Martenson - May 26, 2017 - 09:20
  • 'Look for the helpers' – Manchester rallies round with acts of kindness
  • Not-so-high anxiety: States move fast to protect pot industry
  • Supreme Court Rejects 2 Congressional Districts In North Carolina
  • Alabama governor signs law giving thousands of felons their right to vote back
  • Boost Your Retirement Savings
  • Europe Joins Race For Cheaper Batteries With New Gigafactory
  • The Future of Fish Is Farmed

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Categories: Economics