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Economics

How Electricity Cooperatives in the US are Paving the Way for a Renewable Future

Shareable Magazine - June 19, 2017 - 10:24

Curtis Wynn had a problem. Since 1997, Wynn has led the Roanoke Electric Cooperative in North Carolina. For a good chunk of that time, he'd been pushing for the cooperative's members to adopt clean technology. The problem? His members thought their bills were too high — some were paying more than $200 a month. A third of the co-op's members live in mobile homes and about a half live in single family homes — almost none live in apartments. Many of these buildings were badly in need of efficiency upgrades.

Categories: Economics

The Case for Local, Community-led Sustainable Energy Programs

Shareable Magazine - June 19, 2017 - 10:06

The energy infrastructure that we inherited from the 20th century is one dominated by fossil fuels and uranium, mined in relatively few localities in the world. The distribution and refining of these fuels is tightly held by a few large corporations. Electricity generation typically occurs in plants that hold local or regional monopolies, with vast profit potential. While gasoline is burned in millions of vehicles, the distribution system remains within the control of a few corporations, which often have regional or national oligopoly or monopoly control.

Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 6/19 - Rigged Jobs, The Growing Revolution

Chris Martenson - June 19, 2017 - 07:06
  • Spain’s Wounds Run Deep as Economy Retraces Crisis Losses
  • Rigged
  • BofA: "Has The Fed Become Concerned About The Surge In Stocks?"
  • Who Holds the DEA Accountable When Its Missions Cost Lives?
  • Using Texts as Lures, Government Spyware Targets Mexican Activists and Their Families
  • Are Russia And The Saudis Planning A Natural Gas Cartel?
  • The Growing Revolution
  • Atlantic faces the rare prospect of two active tropical storms in June

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Categories: Economics

Kirk Sorensen: The Future Of Energy?

Chris Martenson - June 18, 2017 - 11:20

Imagine a form of nuclear energy with greater output and virtually no safety issues. 

Such is the promise of liquid flouride thorium reactors (LFTRs). Kirk Sorensen returns to the podcast this week to update us on the current state of thorium power. 

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Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 6/17 - Falling Rocks in the Promised Land, World Weather Report

Chris Martenson - June 17, 2017 - 07:55
  • Lead found in 20% of baby food samples, especially juices and veggies
  • The Breakthrough: Uncovering NYC Cops Making Millions in Suspicious Deals
  • Falling Rocks in the Promised Land
  • Qatar's Crisis With Saudi Arabia And Gulf Neighbors Has Decades-Long Roots
  • American Chipmakers Had a Toxic Problem. Then They Outsourced It
  • The pitfalls and potential of inexpensive 3D scanning solutions 
  • Yemen War Threatens Crucial Oil Chokepoint
  • World Weather Report

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Categories: Economics

Everything You Need To Know About The Credit Impulse

Chris Martenson - June 16, 2017 - 16:23
Executive Summary
  • The case of the missing credit impulse
  • The credit impulse is the worst its been in recent history
  • How the situation is deteriorating fast
  • Why a credit impulse-driven recession is nigh

If you have not yet read Part 1: The Pin To Pop This Mother Of All Bubbles? available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

The Case Of The Missing Credit Impulse

An enormous oversight of nearly every major economist is the role of debt in both fostering current growth but also stealing from future growth. 

It seems like such a simple concept, and it’s one I covered in great detail back in 2008 in the original Crash Course, but it remains a mysterious oversight of most here in 2017.  The concept is easy enough; if I borrow money to increase my spending here today, it probably makes sense to take note of that if you're an economist responsible for tracking spending.

My debt-funded spending today is my lack of spending in the future when I pay down the debt. 

Professor Steve Keen has this topic nailed beautifully. In it, he explains how even simply keeping a massive pile of previously accumulated debt at the same level as last year is a net negative on economic growth. A very simple and a very profound concept that still is not a part of conventional thinking.

Now here where things get interesting. And frightening. If we look at...

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Categories: Economics

The Pin To Pop This Mother Of All Bubbles?

Chris Martenson - June 16, 2017 - 16:23

Global macro economic data has been weak for many years, but there’s now a very real chance of a world-wide recession happening in 2017.

Why? A dramatic and worsening shortfall in new credit creation.

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Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 6/16 - Good News Friday: Humans With Superhuman Vision; To Be Happier, Take Public Transport

Chris Martenson - June 16, 2017 - 08:50
  • Taking Public Transport Instead Of Driving To Work Makes People Happier, Study Suggests
  • Humans With Super Human Vision
  • Now, Your Financial Advisor Will Have To Put You First (Sometimes)
  • Oregon Pay Equity Act becomes law
  • Brixton riding school brings joy to inner city kids
  • What If (Almost) Every Gene Affects (Almost) Everything?
  • The Solar Industry Is Creating Jobs Nearly 17 Times Faster Than the Rest of the US Economy
  • Judge Delivers Blow To Trump Administration In Dakota Access Fight

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Categories: Economics

Key Takeaways from the New Cities Summit

Shareable Magazine - June 15, 2017 - 18:38

Ten years ago Songdo, South Korea, was underwater. Today, it's a city in Incheon's free economic zone with 20 million square feet of LEED certified buildings — 40 percent of all LEED buildings in South Korea. That's dozens of high rises. In fact, it's a whole city's worth. Songdo is the very definition of a new, master planned city; one in which sustainability and well-being are incorporated from the beginning.

Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 6/15 - What To Make Of Ultra-Low Volatility, Big Oil Pivots To Renewables

Chris Martenson - June 15, 2017 - 06:36
  • Ultra-low Volatility #ThisTimeIsDifferent
  • How Wells Fargo's Cutthroat Corporate Culture Allegedly Drove Bankers To Fraud
  • You Won't Believe This Stupid New Law Against Cash And Bitcoin
  • Big Science
  • Governor Jerry Brown of California Advocates the Overthrow of USA
  • The Great Gold Convulsion of 2017
  • Big Oil's Pivot To Renewables Has Begun
  • Michigan health director, 4 others charged with manslaughter over Flint water

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Categories: Economics

Resistance That Won’t Quit: A Timeline of the Keystone XL Pipeline

Despite a Trump executive order undoing nearly nine years of defiance, the story of the-pipeline-that-won’t-die isn’t over.
Categories: Economics

Off The Cuff: What Today's Rate Hike Means

Chris Martenson - June 14, 2017 - 17:30

In this week's Off The Cuff podcast, Chris and John Rubino discuss:

  • Unpacking Today's Rate Hike
    • What will the impact be?
  • When Is A Rate Hike Not A Rate Hike?
    • The Fed's hikes aren't really pulling liquidity out of the market
  • Every time The Fed Talks Gold Goes Down
    • Manipulation (for optics) is alive & well
  • Can The Fed Engineer A Soft Exit?
    • Hardly likely

Chris and John break down today's Fed announcement of a 0.25% rate hike, plus its presented schedule for starting to reduce it's $4.2 trillion balance sheet. 

Click to listen to a sample of this Off the Cuff Podcast or Enroll today to access the full audio and other premium content today.

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Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 6/14 - Warning To NJ On Health Care Costs, Auto Loan Delinquencies Rise

Chris Martenson - June 14, 2017 - 09:02
  • Warning signals to New Jersey on health care costs
  • Insurers seek double-digit health premium increases (New York)
  • In many states, the pension time-bomb is ticking
  • Editorial: Illinois, banana republic, just 17 days to prove it
  • Deficit rises as spending on Medicaid and defense increases
  • US credit card debt to surpass $1 trillion this year, report says
  • Auto loan delinquencies rise as drivers splurge on pricey cars 
  • Chinese local governments still getting deeper in debt
  • Aussie debt is about to top half a trillion
  • Global negative-yielding sovereign debt jumps to $9.5 trln - Fitch

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Categories: Economics

Podcast: How the Regenerative Finance Collective Distributes Wealth and Power

Shareable Magazine - June 14, 2017 - 03:06

In this episode of Next Economy Now, Ryan Honeyman, a partner and worker-owner at LIFT Economy, interviews Kate Poole, who co-leads Regenerative Finance, a collective of young people with wealth working to shift control of capital to communities most affected by racial, economic, and climate injustices. Poole is also a member-leader of Resource Generation, which works to redistribute land, wealth, and power.

Categories: Economics

Missed 'The End of Money' Webinar?

Chris Martenson - June 13, 2017 - 21:35

If you didn't register earlier for the live webinar and are regretting having missed out on the event -- there's good news.

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Categories: Economics

Podcast: What if Our Economic System Was Set Up to Generate Happiness?

Shareable Magazine - June 13, 2017 - 15:42

In this episode, we spoke with Liz Ziedler, co-founder of Happy City Bristol, an organization geared towards fostering holistic happiness in Bristol, U.K., through measurement tools, workshops, and campaigns. 

Happy City's aim is to "reclaim happiness from commercial triviality and make it a guiding, radical principle for society." The organization invites individuals to explore what truly brings lasting happiness and gives communities the tools to measure and be attentive to what really matters.

Categories: Economics

New Videos Explore the Political Potential of the Commons

Shareable Magazine - June 13, 2017 - 10:56

Just released: A terrific 25-minute video overview of the commons as seen by frontline activists from around the world, "The Commons in Political Spaces: For a Post-capitalist Transition," along with more than a dozen separate interviews with activists on the frontlines of commons work around the globe. The videos were shot at the World Social Forum in Montreal last August, capturing the flavor of discussion and organizing there.

Categories: Economics

Q&A: Landscape Architect Martin Barry on Urban Planning in Prague and Beyond

Shareable Magazine - June 13, 2017 - 10:18

Martin Barry is a landscape architect who chose to leave New York City for Prague, a city with "so much potential." His platform reSITE aims to bring international perspectives and expertise concerning contemporary, resilient, and sustainable cities by organizing an annual conference, among other activities. What was the path to creating such a platform from scratch, one of the most respected in Europe today? Barry discussed his vision of the city, the future of architecture and planning, and reSITE's projects with Petra Jansová for Aktualne.cz, a Czech leading online news media.

Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 6/13 - Your Data Trail Is A Gold Mine, All Markets "Increasingly At Risk"

Chris Martenson - June 13, 2017 - 06:10
  • Russian Cyber Hacks on U.S. Electoral System Far Wider Than Previously Known
  • Jeff Sessions poised for legal minefield as he prepares to testify on Russia
  • Massive Central Bank Asset Purchases: Last Ditch Effort To Save Economy & Cap Gold Price
  • Bill Gross: "All Markets Are Increasingly At Risk"
  • How the U.S. Triggered a Massacre in Mexico
  • Your Data Trail Is Like a Gold Mine
  • Months of Deadly Anti-Government Protests in Venezuela
  • Is This The First Sign Of A U.S., Chinese Solar War?

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Categories: Economics

Why the Open Access Movement in Agriculture Matters

Shareable Magazine - June 12, 2017 - 10:31

Western discourse around open access has largely been restricted to academic, scholarly communications circles. In fact, many friends and colleagues have told me they first encountered open access when, after graduating from university, they were confronted with the fact they no longer had access to school databases; or when online article searches reached the dead-end prompt "click here to pay for access."

Categories: Economics