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Economics

How Mississippi Banks are Disrupting the Cycle of Poverty

Shareable Magazine - September 12, 2016 - 07:15

Photo credit: Yes! Magazine

Categories: Economics

For Workers Who Feel Like Part of a Machine, These Companies Get It Right

The Good Work Code attempts to re-examine what workers and employers want and to build jobs around shared values.
Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 9/11 - A Strange Thing Happened in the Stratosphere, Is America Any Safer 15 Years Later?

Chris Martenson - September 11, 2016 - 09:04
  • Seeking the Final Faces for a 9/11 Tapestry of Grief, Loss, Life and Joy
  • ‘We’re the Only Plane in the Sky’ 
  • 15 Years After 9/11, Is America Any Safer?
  • After mass shooting, San Bernardino endures a surge in deadly violence: 150 shootings, 47 slayings
  • Murder Rates Rose in a Quarter of the Nation’s 100 Largest Cities
  • A Strange Thing Happened in the Stratosphere
  • Climate change and other human activities are affecting species migration
  • Melting Glaciers Are Wreaking Havoc on Earth's Crust 

Join the conversation »

Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 9/11 - A Strange Thing Happened in the Stratosphere, Is America Any Safer 15 Years Later?

Chris Martenson - September 11, 2016 - 09:04
  • Seeking the Final Faces for a 9/11 Tapestry of Grief, Loss, Life and Joy
  • ‘We’re the Only Plane in the Sky’ 
  • 15 Years After 9/11, Is America Any Safer?
  • After mass shooting, San Bernardino endures a surge in deadly violence: 150 shootings, 47 slayings
  • Murder Rates Rose in a Quarter of the Nation’s 100 Largest Cities
  • A Strange Thing Happened in the Stratosphere
  • Climate change and other human activities are affecting species migration
  • Melting Glaciers Are Wreaking Havoc on Earth's Crust 

Join the conversation »

Categories: Economics

6 Tips on Making Money and Staying Sane When You Work From Home

How to deal with anxiety, self-doubt, and “the check’s in the mail.”
Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 9/10 - Wells Fargo Fires 5,300, Stocks End Two-Month Snooze With Plunge

Chris Martenson - September 10, 2016 - 07:34
  • Weekend Edition: The Fed’s Only Escape Is to Trash the Dollar
  • No Stimulus, No Peace as Stocks End Two-Month Snooze With Plunge
  • The Only Sure Conclusion About the G20 Summit
  • 5,300 Wells Fargo employees fired for creating over 2 million phony accounts
  • Wells Fargo Fires 5,300 For Engaging In Massive Fraud, Creating Over 2 Million Fake Accounts
  • Shoving us at gunpoint toward the cashless society
  • Infrastructure Spending and America’s Ailing Power Grid
  • Failure of Inflation Targeting?!
  • Brazil makes big push in Asia
  • Is Another Attica on the Horizon?

Join the conversation »

Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 9/10 - Wells Fargo Fires 5,300, Stocks End Two-Month Snooze With Plunge

Chris Martenson - September 10, 2016 - 07:34
  • Weekend Edition: The Fed’s Only Escape Is to Trash the Dollar
  • No Stimulus, No Peace as Stocks End Two-Month Snooze With Plunge
  • The Only Sure Conclusion About the G20 Summit
  • 5,300 Wells Fargo employees fired for creating over 2 million phony accounts
  • Wells Fargo Fires 5,300 For Engaging In Massive Fraud, Creating Over 2 Million Fake Accounts
  • Shoving us at gunpoint toward the cashless society
  • Infrastructure Spending and America’s Ailing Power Grid
  • Failure of Inflation Targeting?!
  • Brazil makes big push in Asia
  • Is Another Attica on the Horizon?

Join the conversation »

Categories: Economics

If Everything's Doing So Great, How Come I’m Not?

Chris Martenson - September 9, 2016 - 17:26

Whether it's struggling to keep up with the rising cost of living, a 0% return on savings, working longer hours while real wages stagnate, scrimping to pay back education loans, despairing at the abuses of power in our banking and political systems, or lamenting the loss of nourishing social interaction in our increasingly isolated and digital lifestyle — most "regular" people find their own personal experiences to be at odds with the rosy "Everything is awesome!" narrative trumpeted by our media.

Join the conversation »

Categories: Economics

If Everything's Doing So Great, How Come I’m Not?

Chris Martenson - September 9, 2016 - 17:26

Whether it's struggling to keep up with the rising cost of living, a 0% return on savings, working longer hours while real wages stagnate, scrimping to pay back education loans, despairing at the abuses of power in our banking and political systems, or lamenting the loss of nourishing social interaction in our increasingly isolated and digital lifestyle — most "regular" people find their own personal experiences to be at odds with the rosy "Everything is awesome!" narrative trumpeted by our media.

Join the conversation »

Categories: Economics

The Keys To Prosperity

Chris Martenson - September 9, 2016 - 17:26
Executive Summary
  • What are the big systemic trends that will impact our personal prosperity?
  • Realizing why the future will have less of everything
  • Strategies for thriving with less
  • The importance of owning & managing capital

If you have not yet read Part 1: If Everything's Doing So Great, How Come I’m Not? available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

In Part 1, we asked 30 questions as a means of assessing whether individuals and households are doing better or worse than they were 10 years ago (2007) and 16 years ago (in 2000)—before the dot-com meltdown recession and the Global Financial Meltdown recession of 2008-09.

Identifying Systemic Trends

These questions attempt to sort out generalized decay that affects everyone—declines in purchasing power, quality of goods and services, etc.—from declines in individual/household health, well-being and financial security.

The questions also attempt to sharpen our awareness of systemic trends: are our prospects brightening or dimming? Are government services improving or declining as our taxes increase?

General trends manifest in different ways in each community/region.  For example, the city and county of San Francisco is booming, with strong growth of population (866,000 residents), jobs, rents, housing valuations and tax revenues. Yet even as the city and county of San Francisco’s annual budget swells to an incomprehensible $9.6 billion—larger than the budgets of many U.S. state governments, and four times the annual budget of the city and county of Honolulu, with 998,000 residents—the homeless problem in San Francisco becomes ever more intractable, intrusive and disruptive, despite tens of millions of dollars devoted specifically to improving the options available to the homeless.

This is an example of larger trends that manifest in one way or another in the majority of communities: increasing costs and complexity, diminishing returns on money spent, frustration by taxpayers receiving unsatisfactory services as tax revenues increase, and problems that continue to worsen regardless of how much money is thrown at them.

There are many causal factors driving these trends of decay, rising costs and diminishing returns: a state-cartel system of regulatory capture that enforces cartels and limits competition; rising complexity of regulations that result in reduced productivity and higher costs; a “vetocracy” (Francis Fukuyama’s term) in which special interests can veto any measure with their political clout that impinges on their wealth and power; central bank monetary policies that enrich the wealthy and strip interest income from everyone else; and government manipulation of statistics and markets to manage perceptions—in effect, ignore your lying eyes and believe us: everything’s going great!

Then there's the shadowy monster in the room...

Join the conversation »

Categories: Economics

The Keys To Prosperity

Chris Martenson - September 9, 2016 - 17:26
Executive Summary
  • What are the big systemic trends that will impact our personal prosperity?
  • Realizing why the future will have less of everything
  • Strategies for thriving with less
  • The importance of owning & managing capital

If you have not yet read Part 1: If Everything's Doing So Great, How Come I’m Not? available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

In Part 1, we asked 30 questions as a means of assessing whether individuals and households are doing better or worse than they were 10 years ago (2007) and 16 years ago (in 2000)—before the dot-com meltdown recession and the Global Financial Meltdown recession of 2008-09.

Identifying Systemic Trends

These questions attempt to sort out generalized decay that affects everyone—declines in purchasing power, quality of goods and services, etc.—from declines in individual/household health, well-being and financial security.

The questions also attempt to sharpen our awareness of systemic trends: are our prospects brightening or dimming? Are government services improving or declining as our taxes increase?

General trends manifest in different ways in each community/region.  For example, the city and county of San Francisco is booming, with strong growth of population (866,000 residents), jobs, rents, housing valuations and tax revenues. Yet even as the city and county of San Francisco’s annual budget swells to an incomprehensible $9.6 billion—larger than the budgets of many U.S. state governments, and four times the annual budget of the city and county of Honolulu, with 998,000 residents—the homeless problem in San Francisco becomes ever more intractable, intrusive and disruptive, despite tens of millions of dollars devoted specifically to improving the options available to the homeless.

This is an example of larger trends that manifest in one way or another in the majority of communities: increasing costs and complexity, diminishing returns on money spent, frustration by taxpayers receiving unsatisfactory services as tax revenues increase, and problems that continue to worsen regardless of how much money is thrown at them.

There are many causal factors driving these trends of decay, rising costs and diminishing returns: a state-cartel system of regulatory capture that enforces cartels and limits competition; rising complexity of regulations that result in reduced productivity and higher costs; a “vetocracy” (Francis Fukuyama’s term) in which special interests can veto any measure with their political clout that impinges on their wealth and power; central bank monetary policies that enrich the wealthy and strip interest income from everyone else; and government manipulation of statistics and markets to manage perceptions—in effect, ignore your lying eyes and believe us: everything’s going great!

Then there's the shadowy monster in the room...

Join the conversation »

Categories: Economics

Off The Cuff: Paradox!

Chris Martenson - September 9, 2016 - 12:10

IIn this week's Off The Cuff podcast, Chris and Charles Hugh Smith discuss:

  • We Increasingly Live In A Paradox World
    • What we're told increasingly doesn't match what we see
  • The Politicized Fed
    • The evidence is clear the Fed definitely follows a political agenda
  • The War On Cash Intensifies
    • Ken Rogoff's "less-cash" proposal
  • The Peril Of Underfunded Pensions
    • A time bomb ticking loudly...

Click to listen to a sample of this Off the Cuff Podcast or Enroll today to access the full audio and other premium content today.

Join the conversation »

Categories: Economics

Off The Cuff: Paradox!

Chris Martenson - September 9, 2016 - 12:10

IIn this week's Off The Cuff podcast, Chris and Charles Hugh Smith discuss:

  • We Increasingly Live In A Paradox World
    • What we're told increasingly doesn't match what we see
  • The Politicized Fed
    • The evidence is clear the Fed definitely follows a political agenda
  • The War On Cash Intensifies
    • Ken Rogoff's "less-cash" proposal
  • The Peril Of Underfunded Pensions
    • A time bomb ticking loudly...

Click to listen to a sample of this Off the Cuff Podcast or Enroll today to access the full audio and other premium content today.

Join the conversation »

Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 9/9 - Good News Friday: Here Comes The Sun, The Value Of Exercise

Chris Martenson - September 9, 2016 - 09:35
  • Americans are quitting their jobs — and that’s a good sign
  • A Dog Is Re-Elected Mayor for a Third Term, Proving Politicians Are Useless
  • What's The Value Of Exercise? $2,500
  • Soft Robot
  • “Cool shirt!”: Nanoporous polyethylene fabric acts as reverse greenhouse
  • Here Comes the Sun: Solar Power Is Offically Reshaping Our Energy Production
  • Vitamin B12 as Protection for the Aging Brain

Join the conversation »

Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 9/9 - Good News Friday: Here Comes The Sun, The Value Of Exercise

Chris Martenson - September 9, 2016 - 09:35
  • Americans are quitting their jobs — and that’s a good sign
  • A Dog Is Re-Elected Mayor for a Third Term, Proving Politicians Are Useless
  • What's The Value Of Exercise? $2,500
  • Soft Robot
  • “Cool shirt!”: Nanoporous polyethylene fabric acts as reverse greenhouse
  • Here Comes the Sun: Solar Power Is Offically Reshaping Our Energy Production
  • Vitamin B12 as Protection for the Aging Brain

Join the conversation »

Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 9/8 - Dakota Access Pipeline Saga Turns Violent, The Future Of Oil Supply

Chris Martenson - September 8, 2016 - 08:06
  • Chicago gangs no longer know or fear the police, and bodies pile up
  • Coda in the Key of F2654hD4
  • Gold's Best Kept Secret
  • How Elizabeth Holmes' House Of Cards Came Tumbling Down
  • On the Sidelines in Cash – PM Correction Over – and Fed Manipulations
  • What’s Really Going On With The OPEC Freeze? – Interview With Robin Mills
  • Dakota Access Pipeline Saga Turns Violent 
  • People are almost completely ignoring a looming crisis for oil 

Join the conversation »

Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 9/8 - Dakota Access Pipeline Saga Turns Violent, The Future Of Oil Supply

Chris Martenson - September 8, 2016 - 08:06
  • Chicago gangs no longer know or fear the police, and bodies pile up
  • Coda in the Key of F2654hD4
  • Gold's Best Kept Secret
  • How Elizabeth Holmes' House Of Cards Came Tumbling Down
  • On the Sidelines in Cash – PM Correction Over – and Fed Manipulations
  • What’s Really Going On With The OPEC Freeze? – Interview With Robin Mills
  • Dakota Access Pipeline Saga Turns Violent 
  • People are almost completely ignoring a looming crisis for oil 

Join the conversation »

Categories: Economics

How to Improve Your Community's Internet Connectivity

Shareable Magazine - September 7, 2016 - 16:48

Photo credit: kevin dooley via Foter.com / CC BY. Article cross-posted from ILSR's Community Broadband Networks site.

Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 9/7 - Negative Rates Here To Stay, BOJ Errors Threaten Lasting Scar For Central Banks

Chris Martenson - September 7, 2016 - 07:28
  • California Court Case Opens Door for Pension Benefit Reductions
  • China's pension funds under pressure with rising payments: Xinhua
  • SC Treasurer: Taxpayers could pay state pension debt if lawmakers don't act
  • Saudi Arabia Said to Weigh Canceling $20 Billion of Projects
  • Study: Mich. tuition hikes, aid cuts boost student debt
  • Companies Getting Paid to Borrow in Europe as Bond Binge Resumes
  • Chinese banks' shadow loans grow despite regulatory glower
  • Shocking Spiral of Unpaid Debt: Another 800 Million Euros Added to the Bill
  • Cash Piles at American Companies Are Shrinking
  • Ministries’ budget requests for fiscal 2017 top ¥100 trillion third straight year
  • Draghi Nears His QE3 as ECB Seen Relying on More Stimulus
  • Bank of Japan’s errors threaten lasting scar for central banks
  • Negative rates will stay for another five years, JPMorgan warns
  • Bernanke sees good reasons for Fed to keep large balance sheet

Join the conversation »

Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 9/7 - Negative Rates Here To Stay, BOJ Errors Threaten Lasting Scar For Central Banks

Chris Martenson - September 7, 2016 - 07:28
  • California Court Case Opens Door for Pension Benefit Reductions
  • China's pension funds under pressure with rising payments: Xinhua
  • SC Treasurer: Taxpayers could pay state pension debt if lawmakers don't act
  • Saudi Arabia Said to Weigh Canceling $20 Billion of Projects
  • Study: Mich. tuition hikes, aid cuts boost student debt
  • Companies Getting Paid to Borrow in Europe as Bond Binge Resumes
  • Chinese banks' shadow loans grow despite regulatory glower
  • Shocking Spiral of Unpaid Debt: Another 800 Million Euros Added to the Bill
  • Cash Piles at American Companies Are Shrinking
  • Ministries’ budget requests for fiscal 2017 top ¥100 trillion third straight year
  • Draghi Nears His QE3 as ECB Seen Relying on More Stimulus
  • Bank of Japan’s errors threaten lasting scar for central banks
  • Negative rates will stay for another five years, JPMorgan warns
  • Bernanke sees good reasons for Fed to keep large balance sheet

Join the conversation »

Categories: Economics