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Storing your Harvest in a Root Cellar

Chris Martenson - January 19, 2015 - 09:51

When it comes to storing your harvest, you have a couple of options. Freezing, dehydrating, canning, and storing fresh in a root cellar. I prefer freezing berries, corn, beans, peppers, peas, tomato based vegetable soup and eggplant. I like to dehydrate my herbs, early season apples and pears. Canning is great for pickles, tomato based soup (which can also be frozen), and beets. The root cellar is a great place to store your late season fruits, root vegetables and pumpkins for the winter. Onions, carrots, potatoes, parsnips, turnips, cabbage, pears, and apples do well in a root cellar.

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Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 1/19 - Cryptocurrency On Trial, We Are In A Financial Meltdown

Chris Martenson - January 19, 2015 - 08:06
  • We Are in a Financial Meltdown: Nomi Prins
  • Richest 1% Likely to Control Half of Global Wealth by 2016, Study Finds
  • Obama Will Focus on Wealth Inequality—Not Just Income
  • Cryptocurrency On Trial
  • Red States Are Reinventing Medicaid to Make It More Expensive and Bureaucratic
  • What to Do With a Dying Neighborhood
  • Oil Industry Withdraws From High Cost Areas
  • BMW Sees Cheap Gas Making Electric Cars a Harder Sell

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Categories: Economics

New Report Points to Sharing as Unifying Force for Global Change

Shareable Magazine - January 19, 2015 - 07:00

An independent, civil society organization campaigning for a fairer sharing of wealth, power and resources, Share the World's Resources (STWR) recently released Sharing As Our Common Cause, a report detailing all the ways sharing can act as a unifying force to address multiple planetary crises.

Categories: Economics

A Quick Sanity Check

Chris Martenson - January 18, 2015 - 21:06

Sometimes it pays to step way back and look at things from a high level.

In response to the 2008 crisis, the world's major central banks pumped an unprecedented amount of monetary stimulus into the system -- all in the name of kick starting enough economic growth to pull the planet out of its fundamental sinkhole of Too Much Debt.

More than six years and over $4 trillion later, what exactly can we say it did for us?

Not enough, as the following short video summarizes.

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Categories: Economics

New Anti-Spam Measures

Chris Martenson - January 18, 2015 - 10:14

An increasing volume of spambots have been hitting PeakProsperity.com over the past few months.

In response, we've just activated a beefier spam protection service this weekend. Preliminary results look good in that spam bot postings are way down over the past 24 hours. 

But a few users have experienced trouble posting comments, as the new system wasn't 100% sure they were real people and thus blocked their posts.

We'll be tweaking the software to reduce this issue, but it may take several days to get right.

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Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 1/18 - 'Francogeddon' Arrives, The Great Wage Slowdown

Chris Martenson - January 18, 2015 - 08:41
  • Obama Proposes New Tax Increases on Wealthy to Help Middle Class
  • Driving the Obama Tax Plan: The Great Wage Slowdown
  • Getting Connected
  • Oh Switzerland, What Have You Done?
  • 'Francogeddon': Swiss central bank stuns market with policy U-turn 
  • Hungary’s Orban Makes World’s Best Trade on Swiss Franc Loans
  • Inside New York City’s newest recycling center 
  • Why the Entire U.S. Weather Satellite System is at Risk

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Categories: Economics

Gail Tverberg: This Is The Beginning Of The End For Oil Production

Chris Martenson - January 17, 2015 - 09:28

With the recent collapse in the price of oil, Gail Tverberg, returns to discuss the likely impact on the US shale oil industry, as well as the global market for oil. 

While as an actuary, Gail is one to avoid hyperbole and the let the numbers speak, her analysis of the outlook for future oil production is nothing short of dire.

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Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 1/17 - Green Energy Inspiration, Should Minimum Wage Be Higher In Cities?

Chris Martenson - January 17, 2015 - 08:36
  • Local and state police can’t use federal law to seize assets anymore
  • Slow Rise in Consumer Prices May Stymie the Fed
  • The Cruel Oil-Market Math Conspiring Against ETF Bulls
  • Should Cities Have a Different Minimum Wage Than Their State?
  • Majority of U.S. public school students are in poverty
  • Green-Energy Inspiration Off the Coast of Denmark
  • 2014 Was Hottest Year On Record

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Categories: Economics

How to Hack City Money: Let 16 Year Olds Vote on Budgets, Get Banks to Invest Locally

Photo by Shutterstock.

1. Participatory budgeting where any resident age 16 and up can vote

in: Vallejo, Calif.

Just over one year after emerging from bankruptcy, the city of Vallejo, Calif., put its budgeting process into the hands of its residents. From October 2012 to early 2013, Vallejo citizens gathered in senior centers, elementary schools, and other public spaces to decide how to spend more than $3 million of their city’s tax dollars. The process, called participatory budgeting, began in Brazil in 1989 and has since spread to more than 1,500 cities worldwide. In the United States, the process first rooted in neighborhood districts in Chicago and New York City. Vallejo is the first place in the country to implement the process citywide.

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It works like this: Residents brainstorm ideas at budget assemblies held throughout the city, and a handful of residents volunteer to turn those ideas into full proposals. Then, the public provides feedback and votes. Solar-powered parking lot lights, public murals, and bike lanes were some of the ideas brainstormed earlier this year during Vallejo’s second round of participatory budgeting. Any resident age 16 and up, regardless of citizenship status, has a vote. The second year of voting concluded in October, and a proposal to provide skills training and services to homeless veterans, seniors, and children received the most votes. Over the next year, city staff will implement this and seven other projects picked by the people of Vallejo.

2. Banking ordinances that reward local investment

in: Cleveland, Ohio

Photo by Shutterstock.

Banks aren’t always in the practice of investing in their communities. Across the country, city governments are demanding change. Cities deposit big money in banks—billions nationwide—so they have some leverage for their demands. Cleveland, San Jose, Seattle, New York, Los Angeles, and other cities have passed responsible banking ordinances that require banks to track and report the ways they’re investing in their local communities. The banks with the best track records win big city deposits.

Cleveland’s 1991 responsible banking ordinance was the first of its kind. To qualify for a Cleveland city contract, banks must open more branches in low- and moderate-income neighborhoods, employ more women and minorities in executive positions, and provide more financial services for local businesses than other banks. Cleveland’s ordinance ensures that city wealth is invested in the institutions that invest in community welfare. Since 1991, 12 cities across the country have adopted similar ordinances.

Shannan Stoll wrote this article for Cities Are Now, the Winter 2015 issue of YES! Magazine. Shannan is a freelance writer living in Washington state.

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Categories: Economics

Off the Cuff: The Return of Volatility

Chris Martenson - January 16, 2015 - 12:50
  • The Return of Volatility
    • Shaping up to be a major theme for 2015
  • The Implications of the End of QE
    • Chris' predicted 3-month delay is arriving now
  • All Eyes on the Fed
    • It's getting nervous (panicked?)
  • How To Position Your Portfolio
    • Prepare for the return of long-absent bargain prices

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Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 1/16 - Flu Vaccine Not Working Well, Will Oil Price Collapse Cause Stock Market Crash?

Chris Martenson - January 16, 2015 - 09:17
  • Flu Vaccine Not Working Well; Only 23 Percent Effective
  • More than a third of American workers don’t get sick leave, and they’re making the rest of us ill
  • Gold Daily and Silver Weekly Charts - Flight to Safety - The Reckoning
  • The End Of Fed QE Didn’t Start Market Madness, It Ended It
  • Rick Rule on oil and Schiff on Switzerland/Currency Wars
  • Will Collapse in Oil Price Cause a Stock Market Crash?
  • EV Sales Continue Despite Low Oil Prices
  • 2014 Was Hottest Year on Record, Surpassing 2010

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Categories: Economics

10 Awesome Uses for Tin Foil

Chris Martenson - January 15, 2015 - 14:20

A great list of non-typical uses for tin foil that can make you more prepared and more resilient around the homestead.

http://www.thereadystore.com/diy/5077/10-awesome-uses-for-tin-foil/

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Categories: Economics

Why Our Central Planners Are Breeding Failure

Chris Martenson - January 15, 2015 - 07:50

As counter-intuitive as it may sound, success rather reliably leads to failure and destabilization.

In the macro-economic arena, I think it highly likely that the monetary and fiscal policies of the past six years that are conventionally viewed as successful will lead to spectacular political and financial failures in 2015 and 2016.

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Categories: Economics

The 6 Reasons The Next Economic Rescue Will Fail

Chris Martenson - January 15, 2015 - 07:48
Executive Summary
  • The 6 Factors
    • Rising inequality
    • Reversion to the mean
    • Cost overages
    • Diminishing returns
    • Misleading measurement
    • Expertise mismatch
  • Why the 'success' of the Federal Reserve and other world central banks is ultimately dooming them to failure

If you have not yet read Why Our Central Planners Are Breeding Failure available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

In Part 1, we examined a variety of reasons why the apparent success of Keynesian monetary and fiscal policy may be transitional and brief rather than permanent.

Here in Part 2, we delve into the six other dynamics that make success destabilizing.

Rising Inequality—Perceived and Real

The highly touted “recovery” has been highly uneven in its distribution. The benefits of rising income and wealth have flowed disproportionately to the top 5%, 1% and even 1/10th of 1%.  Those who didn't make it onto the limited-seating Recovery Bus feel the gap between the prospects and wealth of the top tier and their own wealth and prospects widening. Indeed, psychological studies find that we assess our wealth and social position not by our actual material prosperity, but by the narrowing or widening of the perceived wealth gap with our peers.

This is precisely the situation in the U.S. and China. Both economies are supposedly expanding smartly, but the gains are concentrated in a relative few hands; the Rising Prosperity Bus has few seats.  The vast majority perceive themselves as being left behind, and that is highly...

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Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 1/15 - Carbon Pricing Coming To Ontario, Fracking Good; Coal Bad

Chris Martenson - January 15, 2015 - 07:09
  • Obama Backs Government-Run Internet
  • There’s a blockchain for that!
  • Why the Swiss have let their currency explode
  • A List Of 97 Taxes Americans Pay Every Year
  • Carbon pricing coming to Ontario, strategy to be unveiled this year
  • Ignore What They Say: Cheap Oil Prices Do Not Benefit the Economy
  • Russia Just Pulled Itself Out Of The Petrodollar
  • Over a barrel? Falling oil prices and the environment
  • Study: Fracking Good; Coal Bad
  • Is Keystone Still Viable Amid Low Oil Prices?
  • Senate to vote on whether climate change is happening 

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Categories: Economics

Why Not Competing is the Best Way for Cities to Compete

Shareable Magazine - January 14, 2015 - 09:49

Miami Beach's historic Art Deco district is the second-most-visited tourist destination in Florida. (Cacophony / Wikimedia Commons)

Categories: Economics

10 Game-Changing Projects from Creative Commons' Team Open

Shareable Magazine - January 14, 2015 - 08:33

David Lippman is a college math instructor. Last year, seeing all the money students were forking out for textbooks, he co-wrote two math textbooks and built iMathAS, a free, open-source math assessment and course platform. Primarily published under Creative Commons (CC) licenses, the book and platform are open to community edits and input.

Categories: Economics

Daily Digest 1/14 - Deflation Is Now 'Possible', Oil States Brace For Crude Awakening

Chris Martenson - January 14, 2015 - 08:14
  • Venezuelan shortages, long lines spark violence, arrests
  • Rise in Bank of Italy liabilities fuels worries of capital flight
  • SYRIZA Will Face a €7 Billion Funding Gap if Creditors Back Out
  • Illinois AG: State can use 'police powers' to cut pensions
  • Oil States’ Budgets Face Crude Awakening
  • BOJ said to view oil adding to risk of inflation-target miss
  • China’s Swap Rate Declines Most Since November on Stimulus Bets
  • BoE Governor warns deflation is now 'possible'
  • Court decision could narrow ECB’s quantitative easing options

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Categories: Economics

Ultrathin Electric Motorcycle Designed to Cut through City Traffic

Shareable Magazine - January 14, 2015 - 07:49

Like similarly crowded megacities, Buenos Aires is chock full of people struggling to get places. And going from here to there often requires a noise-making, gas-guzzling, pollution-emitting vehicle of some sort. But the lean, green Sudaca electric motorbike hopes to change that.

Categories: Economics